New research from the University of Calgary explores the role of endometriosis in chronic pelvic pain.  They examined a group of more than 250 women who had been experiencing pelvic pain for more than six months.  

The first interesting finding was that only 26.7% of these women were found to have endometriosis on surgical evaluation.  Endometriosis is often the first culprit that many doctors suspect when confronted with pelvic pain, but this...

Researchers are realizing that we have to look beyond the lesions when understanding endometriosis and pain.  For women with endometriosis, the severity and location of pain is not correlated with the severity and location of endometriosis lesions - there's clearly more going on.  Traditional treatment options like surgery or oral contraceptives target the lesions, but they may not offer permanent relief from pain or endometriosis symptoms.
 

When scien...

As we've reported in a previous article, GI symptoms like bloating, nausea, constipation and diarrhea are actually more common than pain with endometriosis.  Just like pelvic pain with endo, these GI symptoms don't seem to be directly related to the location or severity of endometriosis lesions.

Recent research out of Sweden has provided more insight about these GI symptoms with endometriosis.  First, they confirmed what previous research had shown - more th...

Painful menstruation and general pelvic pain have always been considered the hallmarks of endometriosis.  While pain is obviously common with endometriosis, research suggests that gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms may often be overlooked.  Studies have shown that these GI symptoms - including bloating, nausea, constipation, and diarrhea - are even more common, with more than 90% of women experiencing at least one of these complaints.  Bloating is such a famili...

Surgical removal of endometriosis lesions is a common treatment that has shown significant benefits for patients. However, there are some important factors to keep in mind to make sure that surgery is right for you.

Women with endometriosis or pelvic pain often feel helpless, at the mercy of their condition.  But new research is challenging this idea, and giving patients a way to take back control of their health. 

In two studies -- (one randomized controlled trial and one qualitative study) -- yoga was shown to have significant benefits for women with endometriosis and pelvic pain.  Both studies were presented at the 2017 International Pelvic Pain Society.  W...

Researchers are finding that the naturally occurring Quercitin may be an important tool in slowing the spread of endometriosis.

A powerful antioxidant and free radical scavenger, Quercitin is a bioflavonoid that can be found in red wine, green tea, apples, and berries. It has already been shown in clinical trials to fight inflammation and reduce chronic pelvic pain.  Now researchers are exploring whether it also may be able to slow the growth of endometrial...

Endometriosis is present in one out of ten women, often accompanied by chronic pelvic pain, painful intercourse, bloating, and pain with menstruation.  Traditional treatments include laparoscopic surgery and hormone therapy, while physical therapy and yoga have also been shown to be effective in relieving symptoms.

Another treatment option that has been shown to be effective for endometriosis is acupuncture.  Acupuncture is a traditional Chinese medicine whe...

An endometriosis diagnosis can be stressful, and rightly so.  The condition is invisible and poorly understood, and it may feel like there is nothing that can be done.  The accompanying feelings of helplessness can increase stress. Pain research demonstrates that stress increases pain, and gaining a sense of control over a medical condition can reduce both.

Researchers set out to see if a combination of pelvic floor physical therapy and psychological in...

Endometriosis is a complex condition that can be difficult to understand, especially since it can be difficult to find trustworthy information about it on the internet. We've compiled a list of ten things that we think everyone with endometriosis (or even if you just suspect you may have it) should know.

1.  Endometriosis is common

Because it's difficult to diagnose, estimates range widely about how common endo actually is, but most experts believe as many as...

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